The Colgate Scene
January 2005

Around the college

On Family Weekend, students in the Japan Club suit up before their demonstration at World Expo in the Hall of Presidents. [Photo by Aubrey Graham '06]

Also:
Residential education progress: Sale of Greek-letter houses proceeds

Dino's egg nesting place

Representatives from one of the top universities in Germany, the Albert-Ludwigs Universität in Freiburg, recently spent time at Colgate learning how the university is run -- from admission, curriculum design, and funding to marketing and career services.

As they plan for major changes at the German university, two groups visited campus, one focused on curricular reform and the other on interdisciplinary programs. Their work is part of a broad effort aimed at creating a singular European system of colleges and universities -- a task that must be accomplished by 2010. Key to this process is the addition of bachelor's programs. Currently, there is no such degree; students go right to master's programs.

Gert Fehlner, a member of the curriculum committee at Albert-Ludwigs, said that Colgate's Core program could have an impact on its plans in the near future. He is interested in the broad scope of the Core, which is very different from the highly specialized degree programs currently offered at most European universities. Implementing changes, though, is going to be difficult, as the university, which was founded in 1457, has been doing things the same way for quite some time.

Regardless of the outcome, those at Colgate who met with the delegation enjoyed the opportunity to share their practices. Ken Lewandoski, director of off-campus study, said the visits will strengthen Colgate's relationship with Albert-Ludwigs, which serves as the host institution for the Freiburg Study Group.

"As we build on our international connections, the hope is that the visit will bring Colgate more into focus for faculty and administrators at Freiburg, and begin the process of connecting Freiburg faculty with Colgate faculty in terms of mutual academic interest. That will ultimately benefit both our and their faculty and students," said Lewandoski.


The Bill Warfield Big Band, which is based in New York City, presented compositions by Antonio Carlos Jobim, Ivan Lins, Luis Bonfa, and other musical journeys into samba and bossa nova in a concert titled "Sounds of Brazil" in the Chapel in October. [Photo by Aubrey Graham '06]

The Institute of International Education (IIE) has ranked Colgate sixth among its peer group of baccalaureate colleges in the number of Fulbright fellows, making it one of the top Fulbright-producing colleges in the nation. Five Colgate graduates were recently granted Fulbright awards for the 2004-2005 academic year.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program helps participants develop skills they need to thrive in an increasingly global environment by providing funding for one academic year of study or research abroad, after graduation from an accredited university. Fellows undertake self-designed programs in disciplines ranging from social sciences, business, communication, and performing arts to physical sciences, engineering, and education.

During the previous five academic years, a total of 17 Colgate new alumni were awarded Fulbrights. Colgate's 2004-2005 Fulbright winners (all Class of 2004) and their projects are: Aaron C. Sheldon, Jonathan A. Bedard, and Theresa N. Duong (teaching English as a foreign language in South Korea); Matthew E. Schutzer (medical research at a lab in Germany); and Stephen T. Fairchild (teaching English as a foreign language in Germany).

"We encourage our students to push their intellectual limits and explore the world beyond Colgate's campus," said President Chopp. "We are thrilled that these five graduates will serve as ambassadors for Colgate abroad." (IIE) has ranked Colgate sixth among its peer group of baccalaureate colleges in the number of Fulbright fellows, making it one of the top Fulbright-producing colleges in the nation. Five Colgate graduates were recently granted Fulbright awards for the 2004-2005 academic year.

The Fulbright U.S. Student Program helps participants develop skills they need to thrive in an increasingly global environment by providing funding for one academic year of study or research abroad, after graduation from an accredited university. Fellows undertake self-designed programs in disciplines ranging from social sciences, business, communication, and performing arts to physical sciences, engineering, and education.

During the previous five academic years, a total of 17 Colgate new alumni were awarded Fulbrights. Colgate's 2004-2005 Fulbright winners (all Class of 2004) and their projects are: Aaron C. Sheldon, Jonathan A. Bedard, and Theresa N. Duong (teaching English as a foreign language in South Korea); Matthew E. Schutzer (medical research at a lab in Germany); and Stephen T. Fairchild (teaching English as a foreign language in Germany).

"We encourage our students to push their intellectual limits and explore the world beyond Colgate's campus," said President Chopp. "We are thrilled that these five graduates will serve as ambassadors for Colgate abroad."


Senior Jennie Skelton ponders her reflection through positive statements written on a mirror during the Women's Studies Center's "Sex Affair," a program on sexual health issues in October. The event was part of "Sex Week," a student-organized series of educational and informational events aimed at addressing important issues, such as self-esteem and body image, date rape, and health, that are related to what is sometimes considered a taboo subject. [Photo by Aubrey Graham '06]

Colgate's three highest ranking university relations officers were recently promoted as part of preparations for the university's next capital campaign. Robert Tyburski '74 was named vice president and senior philanthropic advisor; Murray Decock '80 was appointed vice president for institutional advancement (formerly development) and campaign director; and RuthAnn Loveless MA'72 has become vice president for alumni affairs.

Sarah Conlon joined Colgate as director of the Annual Fund in January. With 10 years of annual fund experience in higher education, she previously worked at Wellesley College and Tufts University, where she directed The Tufts Fund for three years.

One of Israel's most prominent "new historians" spent a week at Colgate discussing the Israeli-Palestinian conflict with students and professors in a variety of settings.

Ilan Pappe, a senior lecturer at Haifa University, Israel, and director of the Emil Touma Institute for Palestinian Studies in Haifa, began his visit on Oct. 11. Pappe discussed "The Role of Islam in the Israel-Palestine Conflict" at a lecture in Olin Hall; introduced the documentary film Jenin, Jenin at Little Hall; spoke at a Hamilton Forum event in the Colgate Inn; taught two mini-courses; held several faculty seminars; and had dinner and discussions with students at two college theme houses on Broad Street.

Pappe's visit was funded by a grant from the CIES Fulbright Visiting Specialists Program: Direct Access to the Muslim World. The program is designed to promote understanding of the Muslim world and civilization by providing opportunities for direct access to scholars specializing in that area.

Daniel Monk, the George W. and Myra T. Cooley Professor of peace studies and director of peace studies, said Pappe's work on the history and historiography of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is extremely important and, he readily admitted, controversial.

"Pappe's work has put him in the center of a great number of disputes concerning how Israel came into being and how the Palestinian diaspora came into being," said Monk. "His understanding of the role that has or hasn't been played by Islam in the history of this conflict is unique." Timing of Pappe's visit was perfect, Monk said, as Colgate has just this year launched a minor concentration in Middle East and Islamic Studies.

Monk also said that establishing global links with scholars and universities in locations where questions of peace, conflict, and security are matters of urgency here and abroad is one of the goals he has set for the Colgate peace studies program.

"My hope, and the hope of the peace studies faculty, is for our program to contribute meaningfully to scholarship in the field, and in the process produce important publications. We want to serve as a resource not only for our immediate community, but for a much wider academic constituency," said Monk, who is in his first year heading the program.

David Blight, a nationally recognized expert on the Civil War and abolitionist Frederick Douglass, discussed how memories of that war and of slavery shape today's thinking about two of the most "troubling and vexing" subjects in the nation's history.

Blight's visit in November was sponsored by the Department of History and the university's Upstate Institute. He gave a lecture and spoke to students in two history classes. The Upstate Institute is working with area residents and Morrisville State College's Johnson Institute to create an Abolitionist Hall of Fame in the hamlet of Peterboro, about 15 miles from Colgate. Gerrit Smith, a philanthropist and social reformer who played a key role in the abolitionist movement, was a lifelong resident of Peterboro. His house served for more than three decades as an important "station" in the Underground Railroad network.

Blight, visit of Yale University's Gilder Lehrman Center for the Study of Slavery, Resistance, and Abolition, met with community members involved in the hall of fame project during his visit.

Kia King '07, a student fellow with the Upstate Institute, is researching Smith's life. She attended Blight's lecture, and said Blight provided students a valuable lesson in the historical importance of the area in which they'll spend four years. King and Jill Tiefenthaler, director of the Upstate Institute and associate dean of the faculty, are members of the Cabinet of Freedom, an advisory board for the Abolitionist Hall of Fame.

In addition to honoring the historical figures responsible for eradicating slavery, the hall of fame intends to bring attention to modern battles against injustice around the world and educate the public about human rights issues. (To see a video clip of Blight's lecture, visit the multimedia page in the News & Events section on www.colgate.edu.)

Art and art history professor Judy Oliver has garnered international attention for her efforts toward the recovery of two leaves stolen from a rare medieval Belgian bible. The author of the only book on 13th-century Belgian manuscript illumination, Oliver had studied the bible as a graduate student in the early 1970s. The manuscript is from the Abbey of Leau but is now housed in the Grand Seminaire in Liege. The stolen leaves (one, coincidentally, from the book of Judith) are known to have been taken since her time there.

In 1993, an Ohio book dealer who had purchased the Judith leaf at Christie's in London and suspected it was misattributed turned to Oliver to help identify its origin. The book's unique style made the leaf's origin unquestionable. "There's nothing like it," she said. She alerted the Belgian curator, and the book dealer returned the leaf to Christie's, where it hung in limbo, awaiting action by the Belgian authorities.

A decade later, a reporter from Le Soir (the leading French-language paper in Brussels) corresponded with Oliver and published the story, "essentially to embarrass the government and the police into getting the leaf at Christie's back," she said. In the meantime, Oliver spotted the second stolen leaf, in a bookdealer's catalogue in Hamburg, Germany, and again contacted the curator. The dealer claims to have sold it to someone in London, who in turn says he does not have it.

The articles worked. This fall, the Judith leaf was returned to the museum, which held a celebratory event. The second leaf, from the book of Leviticus, has yet to be recovered, but Oliver is optimistic. "I started telling every scholar I know, and contacted the AMAR, an association for rare book librarians and curators, so I hope to raise the profile on the problem," she said.


Anthony Annunziata '05, president of the newly revitalized Physics Club, gets a rocket ready for takeoff on Whitnall Field. [Photo by Thomas Balonek]

The Colgate chapter of a prestigious physics honor society, Sigma Pi Sigma, was launched recently, just five days after several of the inductees elicited oohs and aahs from a crowd at Whitnall Field with the firing of homemade rockets that shot hundreds of feet into the air. Welcome to the world of physics at Colgate.

Nearly 25 students, with support from physics and astronomy department faculty members and Adam Weinberg, dean of the college, have mixed academic work and research with some whiz-bang demonstrations in reviving the Colgate Physics Club. Professors and students worked hard last fall to establish the club and become affiliated with the Society of Physics Students (SPS), according to Kiko Galvez, professor of physics and astronomy, who serves as the club's adviser. It has been a boon to faculty members as well as the students, he said.

"Students get a good idea of what is going on at all levels and can relay this back to the department as a form of feedback," he said. "The club brings faculty and students together because faculty also get involved in the activities."

SPS, a nationally recognized scholastic honor society, is a professional association for students and is open to all those interested in physics. Its chapters are restricted to colleges and universities of recognized standing that offer a strong physics major. Both SPS and Sigma Pi Sigma operate within the American Institute of Physics.

On Nov. 16, the Colgate club inducted 10 students into Sigma Pi Sigma at a special ceremony held at the Colgate Inn.

"It's a lifetime induction, and it's really quite prestigious," said Krystle J. Williams '06, president of the Colgate chapter and organizer of the ceremony. Students are elected on the basis of outstanding academic achievement.

Anthony Annunziata '05, president of the Colgate Physics Club, was among those students inducted.

"We do a lot more than work on physics problems on paper," he said. "We do things that are a bit different than the normal physics lab, as well." Some of that involves rocketry, the club's theme for this year.

"Sometimes people say `rocket science, that's hard, that's mysterious.' But really, it's pretty simple stuff. It's using Newton's equation with the right constants and the right terms. It's a good way to get people involved and interested in physics," said Annunziata.

Five rockets, weighing up to 2.5 pounds and costing $50 to $70, were sent whooshing skyward on a day in early November. Club members built them from parts they ordered or found in Lathrop Hall.

Thomas Balonek, professor of physics and astronomy, helped the students coordinate and fund the rocket launch, which served as a tune-up for a bigger event the club is planning for this spring. The club is looking to involve area high school teachers and students in the "rocket day" event as part of its plans for reaching out and providing mentorship to high school students interested in physics.


In October, members of the Class of 2007 gathered one evening in Cutten Dining Hall to create a class mural. The event was part of the class-initiated Sophomore Nights, a series of social events intended to build class community. [Photo by Aubrey Graham '06]

In an effort to expand its reach and provide involved students with well-defined roles, the Center for Outreach, Volunteerism, and Education has implemented paid student internships.

Since the COVE's opening in 2001, said Director Marnie Terhune, it had become clear that "we were trying to do a lot with a skeleton staff." That made expansion the logical next step. Collaborating with the career services office, the COVE advertised the positions last spring and received an overwhelming response. Nine students fill the yearlong internships, which fall under four areas: political awareness, special events, educational outreach, and publicity and promotion. The interns arrived on campus a week before fall semester to begin training -- and haven't slowed down since.

Riding the election excitement of the fall semester, senior political awareness interns Bob Filbin and Amanda Morse worked with several student groups to create Talk, Rock, and Vote, a statewide Political Awareness Day. The event included a political debate between Colgate and Hamilton College; several short speeches on political issues; networking opportunities; and a performance by State Radio, a political music group.

Throughout the year, Filbin and Morse work as the liaisons between various political groups on campus, stressing the relationship between politics and community service. Emphasizing this overlap permits students to see "the importance of their work in a larger context -- statewide, national, and international," said Filbin.

Morse added, "Service shouldn't exist in a vacuum. The people who get out and work on real problems with the community are the ones who should be engaged in the movements for political action and social change."

The trio of special events interns, Alana Perrone '05, Vonzelle Johnson '07, and Bianca Virrilli '05, coordinated a campuswide service day. The special events team also schedules the "Doing Well by Doing Good" luncheon series, assists with campus leadership workshops, and researches potential speakers from nonprofit organizations. Johnson said that bringing people with firsthand nonprofit experience, not just those educated about it, is one of his goals. "I want the information directly from the source and not someone who is on the outside looking in," said Johnson.

Seniors Betsy Harbison and Chrissy Hart, the educational outreach interns, have worked to establish relationships with other campus organizations. The capacity to "think big" is an important component of their positions; they must translate COVE goals into tangible activities and issues.

The publicity and promotion duo of Nate Smiley '05 and Alicia Regina '07 update the COVE website, create a monthly newsletter, and work with local press to increase media coverage, in addition to creating and distributing flyers to promote other COVE events.

The first wave of COVE interns have an ambitious task, but they seem too busy making the Colgate community more active and aware to notice. "Marnie is really setting high standards for us and we are eager to step up to the plate and get the job done," said Johnson. — Elisa Benson '06

China's "invitation [to participate in the recent `G7' economic talks] is official recognition of the restructuring that is occurring as economic modernization spreads globally. Next in line will be India," predicted Jay Mandle, W. Bradford Wiley Professor of economics, in the Oct. 4, 2004 article "China debuts as an economic powerhouse" by Shihoko Goto circulated by United Press International.

". . . war, peace, Kerry, Bush, liberal, conservative. I have no answers, no philosophy, no ceremonies, no ideas. I'm not running for office. I don't care what you think about me. Just try to think, `what if I'm wrong?' Try! Live your life with one more question mark a day. One." — Native American author and filmmaker Sherman Alexie, named one of the top writers of the 21st century by The New Yorker and one of the best American novelists under age 40 by Granta, in his lecture in the Hall of Presidents, sponsored by the Native American Student Association and others, in October.

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